Author Spotlight – Sharon Booth

My final author spotlight of 2015 falls on contemporary romance author, Sharon Booth. Sharon’s latest book is A Kiss from a Rose.

Rose final coverA Kiss from a Rose – Sharon Booth

Flynn Pennington-Rhys is the quiet man of Kearton Bay, so when he finds himself entangled in the chaotic life of Rose MacLean, his whole world turns upside down.

Rose is at a low ebb. With one daughter clearly harbouring a secret, another who has morphed overnight from Shirley Temple into Miley Cyrus, and a mother hell-bent on reliving her misspent youth with her childhood sweetheart, Alec, AKA Red Rum, it’s no wonder her self-esteem is at rock bottom. But when, on top of all this, her best friend goes on ovulation alert, and her slimming club leader has a meltdown, Rose needs someone she can rely on.

It seems, though, that Flynn has his own secret, and as events take an unexpected turn, it’s no longer certain that he can be counted on.

Will the quiet man come through for her? Will her daughters ever sort themselves out? And will her mother ever move on, or is Rose really doomed to years of sleeping in the bath tub?

Amazon UK

Amazon US

 

Excerpt

He smiled half-heartedly and tried again. ‘I do think you should sit down, Rose,’ he began.

She put her hands on his face, cupping it and staring at him intently. ‘You’re a gorgeous bloke, Paddington,’ she told him.

Heat spread over him. ‘Yes, well,’ he murmured, trying to prise her hands away from his face. ‘I wouldn’t say any more. You’ve had a nasty injury and a bit too much to drink.’

She wrapped her arms tightly around his waist. ‘Don’t make me sit down, Paddington,’ she protested, her voice slurry. ‘I haven’t been held for so long, and you smell ever so nice. What are you wearing?’

‘Clothes.’

‘I mean your aftershave, silly. What is it? It’s gorgeous. You’re quite gorgeous. Has anyone ever told you that?’

‘Yes.’

‘Really? Who?’

‘You, a few seconds ago.’

‘Oh. Well, I was right, wasn’t I?’

She lifted her face to him again, and they looked at each other for a moment. Flynn wished he could click his fingers and disappear. He’d never felt so embarrassed, and that was saying something. Then he noticed her eyes had dropped to his lips, and she was moving her face ever closer to his. His heart did a funny little jig, and then she was kissing him.

Warmth flooded through his cold body. All his synapses seemed to be firing at once; hot lava was coursing through his icy veins. Suddenly, he was kissing her back, and she held him tightly, as his hand cupped the back of her head, and he drank her in, like Meggie with a McDonald’s chocolate milkshake.

‘Oh, for God’s sake, Mother, pack it in.’

Flynn’s eyes flew open in shock, as Rose was torn away from him, and Fuchsia shot him an apologetic look.

Rose glared at her daughter. ‘Do you mind? Me and Dr Paddington Bear here were having a meaningful conservation. How dare you interrupt?’

‘Yeah, yeah, sure you were. I’m sorry, Doc,’ said Fuchsia, beginning to lead her away. ‘She always gets this stupid when she’s pissed. Just ignore her.’

Rose looked as if she was about to protest, but then crumbled and allowed herself to be led away.

Flynn was trembling all over. What the hell just happened? He had to get out of there.

‘Had enough?’ Joe asked, helping a sleepy Amy into her coat near the door.

Beside them, Mrs Travers was pulling on her gloves, while somehow managing to keep an iron grip on her sister’s granddaughter, Kylie, who was looking much the worse for wear.

Flynn felt dazed. ‘More than enough. I’m going home.’

Joe grinned at him. ‘Good looking woman, Rose MacLean. You could do worse.’

Do worse! Flynn left the pub without a backward glance.

It was just a kiss—a stupid, meaningless kiss. She’d have forgotten all about it by now. And maybe, by tomorrow, he’d have forgotten about it, too.

*****

And now for my interview with Sharon:

Your first two books have been set in the fictional village of Kearton Bay on the North Yorkshire coast. Can you tell us more about what inspired you to choose this setting and whether future books will be set there?

When I started writing what became the Kearton Bay series, I intended to set it in Somerset. You see, the whole idea was born on a car journey, en route to our holiday in that county. I didn’t have a story planned, as such, just a few interesting, and very persistent, characters. As the story evolved, however, it became clear that these were Yorkshire folk. Not surprising, given I was born and bred in the county. So I started looking for a specific Yorkshire location that would inspire me. Initially, I set the first book in the Dales, but it never felt right. I needed somewhere else, somewhere that suited the characters and was the perfect backdrop for their stories. Then I remembered my visits, many years previously, to Robin Hood’s Bay, and it seemed the perfect place. I went back there to have a look around, and I just knew it was right. I used Robin Hood’s Bay as inspiration for my fictional Kearton Bay. As you say, the first two books were set there, and there will be two further books in the series. The name was in memory of one branch of my family tree—the Keartons—who, ironically, hail from the Yorkshire Dales!

Do you find it hard to come up with ideas for stories? How do you go about it?

I can’t say I find it hard to come up with the ideas. It’s getting them down on paper or on screen that’s the difficult bit! I don’t sit down and think, “Right, what can I write about now?” Ideas just pop into my head as I’m going about my ordinary life. I find that the more mundane the task that I’m carrying out, the more ideas I’m likely to have. Funnily enough, I get a lot of ideas when I’m at the day job! (Hope my boss never reads this.)

How long does it take you to write your first draft? How many more drafts will there be after that?

Well, the first draft of There Must Be an Angel, was written in thirty days exactly, because I wrote it for NaNoWriMo 2011 and I was determined to finish it. I was supposed to reach fifty thousand words during the month of November, but in fact, I managed a full hundred and twenty thousand words. Don’t ask me how, because I don’t think I could do that again to save my life. Having said that, it was complete rubbish. At the time, I thought I’d finished it. Haha! Little did I know it was just the start. I honestly couldn’t tell you how many more drafts I did of Angel. I lost count after the first twenty. Truthfully, very little of that first draft made it to the final version, and it took me almost two and a half years to get it to the point where I was happy to publish it. Writing A Kiss from a Rose was a very different experience. I’d learned such a lot in those two and a half years, and it took me just seven months to complete. I mostly revised as I went along, then did another draft when I’d finished, a further draft after the beta readers had commented, and then the final draft after the editor had cast her beady eyes over it. It was a far less stressful experience than writing Angel, which at one point I’d come close to shredding!

What’s the hardest part of writing for you?

Definitely writing the first draft. Forcing myself to sit at my desk and staring at that empty screen and thinking, “Can I really do this?” To be honest, it’s horrible at times. I don’t know why I do it.

What do you enjoy most about the writing process?

When the words are flowing and the story’s really coming together, and I’m making myself laugh as I write, or I’m really feeling the character’s pain. It’s such a wonderful feeling to really immerse myself in the book. Oh, yes—that’s why I do it!

Is there a recurring theme in your novels or is each one completely different?

I was thinking about this, just the other day, funnily enough. With Angel, there was a strong theme of fathers and daughters. Then with Rose, it was mothers and daughters. With my next novel, it’s got elements of the father/daughter relationship, too. However, what I think runs through all of my stories is the theme of belonging—of finding a home, whether that’s a physical home of bricks and mortar, or a community, or that special someone who makes you feel as if you’re finally safe and you don’t have to look any further. I didn’t set out to make that a recurring theme, but it seems that’s what I write about.

Have you started work on your next novel yet? If so, can you tell us anything about it?

Book three is with my beta readers at the moment. It’s something new entirely—not part of the Kearton Bay series. It’s mostly set in the Yorkshire Dales, and it features an ageing rock star and his spoilt brat of a daughter, a naughty politician and his wife, a young woman who is caught up in something she can’t seem to get out of, and a rather gorgeous sheep farmer!

I see that you’ve recently had some stories published by People’s Friend magazine. Congratulations! Will you continue writing short stories along side your novels? Do you prefer one or the other?

I’ve been lucky enough to have a pocket novel published by People’s Friend, and I’ve just had a short story accepted by them. I was really delighted to write for them. People’s Friend is such a well-established and much respected publication, and I felt that it was a real boost to me when they said yes. I’d love to work with them again, as they’re so lovely to write for and it’s such an easy process. The whole editing thing is taken out of your hands, but you know you can trust them. They know what they’re doing, and they know their market. I’m working on a story now that I hope will be suitable for a pocket novel, and I will hopefully submit more short stories. It’s finding the time. I don’t really prefer one or the other. It’s nice to write all different lengths of stories. Keeps things fresh.

**Sharon also has a free Christmas short story up on Wattpad at the moment. It’s called The Other Side of Christmas and I can really recommend it!**

 

About Sharon

10450375_1548020332081619_595680736266470252_nSharon wrote her first book when she was ten. It was about a boarding school that specialised in ballet and, given that she’d never been to boarding school and hadn’t a clue about ballet, it’s probably a good thing that no copy of this masterpiece survives. Her first published novel was There Must Be An Angel, which is the first in a series of four Kearton Bay stories, set in a fictional village on the North Yorkshire coast, inspired by the beautiful Robin Hood’s Bay. She lives in East Yorkshire, with her husband and their dog, and regularly yells for tea and biscuits while writing, to remind them that she exists. She is one tenth of The Write Romantics, has a love/hate relationship with chocolate, is a devoted Whovian, and just a little obsessed with Sherlock, The Musketeers and Poldark. She freely admits that she would write more books if the BBC didn’t insist on employing such gorgeous men.

Find out more about Sharon here:

Website 

Twitter

Facebook Writer’s page

 

 

Author Spotlight – Alys West

This week, my author in the spotlight is urban fantasy and steampunk writer, Alys West. Her debut novel, Beltane, will be out on December 14th.

Beltane finalBeltane – Alys West

Finn McCloud is a druid, connected by magic to the earth. He’s made a big mistake; one he expects to pay for with his life.

Maeve Blackwell has plans for a new start, free of the façade she so carefully maintains. At Beltane, the Celtic festival of fire on 1st May, all her preparations will come to fruition.

Struggling artist, Zoe Rose is in Glastonbury to work on the illustrations for a book about King Arthur. But when she arrives at Anam Cara, the healing retreat run by Maeve, it’s not the haven she hoped for.

Maeve isn’t the warm-hearted, hippy she expected and Zoe can’t help feeling there’s something very odd about the place. Is it coincidence that the other guests become ill after Maeve’s given them healing? And why did the Green Man carved on a tree in the garden, which she’d felt inexplicably drawn to, mysteriously vanish during a thunderstorm?

As if that wasn’t enough, the weird dreams she’d had all her life are getting worse. Every night she dreams of a handsome stranger. Then, the day after the thunderstorm, she meets Finn. Realising he’s the man she’s dreamt of (not that she’s going to tell him that!) she’s forced to accept that her dreams are premonitions.

With Beltane fast approaching Finn knows that Maeve must be stopped. He’s torn between wanting to protect Zoe from the supernatural world and his desire to be with her. And the more time they spend together the harder it is to keep secrets from her.

When Zoe’s dreams reveal that at Beltane both their lives will be in terrible danger, it’s clear that only by trusting each other can they have any hope of defeating Maeve.

Beltane will be out on Monday 14th December and can be pre-ordered from Amazon.

*****

And now for my interview with Alys:

I know you write in a number of different genres. Please could you tell us more about the genres and a little about the books you’ve written in them?

So far I write urban fantasy and steampunk. I didn’t really know what genre Beltane, my first novel, was when I started writing it. I just wrote the story that I wanted to tell and then tried to fit it within a genre when I started submitting. I think you can best describe it as a supernatural romantic thriller but as that’s not a recognised genre I’ve ended up calling it urban fantasy.

SteampunkMy second novel, The Dirigible King’s Daughter, is a steampunk romance. I’ve been fascinated by the idea of steampunk for a while. I live in York and a couple of years ago I went over to Whitby when the Goth Festival was on. I was intrigued by these people who clearly weren’t goths. They wore brown and had amazing contraptions which seemed to be formed almost entirely of brass cogs. Somewhat later I discovered that was steampunk and, the more I looked into it, the more interesting it became.

Steampunk is an alternative history and works on the theory that the world continued to be powered by steam and never became dependent on oil and electronic technology. Much steampunk is a version of a Victorian world but with more advanced steam technology like dirigibles (or airships). I’ve set my steampunk world in 1897 which meant I could have wonderful Victorian clothes and hats (I got way too fascinated by 1890’s fashion and wasted hours on Pinterest!) and massive amounts of fun with the dialogue.

Do you find it hard to come up with ideas for stories? How do you go about it?

I don’t seem to find it hard to come up with ideas for novels. Ideas for short stories are far more tricky. I definitely seem to need the bigger canvas of a novel. I’m currently doing an MA in Creative Writing at York St John University and one of the things that I’m hoping I’ll learn from that is how to write short stories.

Most of my ideas seem to come from places. Beltane is set in Glastonbury and the idea for the book came fully formed from the place. There’s nowhere else I can think of that has the same mix of history, myth and alternative culture as Glastonbury and, let’s be honest, if weird things are going to happen anywhere they’ll happen in Glastonbury!

The Dirigible King’s Daughter is set in Whitby and was probably directly inspired by the people I’d seen there for the Goth Festival. Because of them the idea of steampunk and Whitby got linked in my brain and, then it just kind of took off from there.

How long does it take you to write your first draft? How many more drafts will there be after that?

I don’t really write a first draft which I know is a bit odd. I’m constantly refining and polishing as I go along which means the process can be very slow compared with some of my writing friends. It took me three years to write Beltane, which included an awful lot of writing and rewriting along the way. However, I have speeded up considerably as I wrote The Dirigible King’s Daughter in about four months. I polished less that time and then did a second draft but I was pretty blessed with that book as it just seemed to tell itself.

What’s the hardest part of writing for you?

I think that depends on the book. I’ve really struggled with various bits of different books. I got in a terrible state about writing the end of Beltane and procrastinated for weeks about it scared that I’d ruin it with a naff ending. The Dirigible King’s Daughter had a tricky beginning when I got in a muddle with flashbacks and how to tell the back story. Lughnasa, which is the follow up to Beltane, had a really sticky middle. It got so sticky that I put it down and wrote The Dirigible King’s Daughter instead just to have something else to think about for a while. I need to get back to Lughnasa and find my way out of the sticky middle and I’m hoping to have time to do that during the Christmas holidays.

What do you enjoy most about the writing process?

I think I just love writing and telling stories. I know that when I’m doing it I’m happier and more alive than when I don’t so I guess I’ll just have to keep writing and hoping that someone wants to read the stories that I tell.

Is there a recurring theme in your novels or is each one completely different?

I’m pretty sure there isn’t a recurring theme but, as I didn’t know that Beltane had a theme until I went to Julie Cohen’s workshop at the 2013 RNA Conference about 3 months after I’d finished writing the book, I may be wrong about that! The theme of Beltane is trust and abuse of trust. I figured that out during Julie’s workshop. The Dirigible King’s Daughter is about loss and grief and how people handle that.

Have you started work on your next novel yet? If so, can you tell us anything about it?

I am about three quarters of the way through a first draft of Lughnasa. As I’ve mentioned it’s the follow up to Beltane and includes some of the same characters. Winston, who is a supporting character in Beltane takes centre stage in Lughnasa. Finn and Zoe are back too but there’s some lovely new characters too. I’m particularly fond of Jenna, who’s had a very hard time after her Mum was murdered six years ago and finds herself torn between her attraction to Winston and her old love, Hal. It’s set in Orkney, which is somewhere that I fell hopelessly in love with when I first visited in 2010 and am very keen to return to next year.

I see that you’ve started publishing one of your books to Wattpad. Can you tell us what made you choose that platform in particular?

Alex ebook cover 1 (1)I’d heard lots of good things about Wattpad and I knew it was very popular for fantasy. I thought it might be a good idea to try out The Dirigible King’s Daughter on there and see how it worked. I’m putting up a chapter a week and, after a very slow start, it’s steadily starting to build up and get some regular readers. Once I’d started with it I rapidly realised that I didn’t have the time to invest in doing all the things that people say you need to do to build a readership on Wattpad and that the book would have to stand or fall on its own. So after changing my profile picture to a steampunk avatar (I am about 25 years older than most of the people on Wattpad!) I just left it to do its own thing. But I am having fun with it. You should have heard me cheer when I finally got over 100 views and when I got a comment on a chapter from someone I didn’t know, it honestly made my week! I’d say it’s a really great way of testing out a book and seeing what works and what maybe needs a bit more work. I’m intending to publish The Dirigible King’s Daughter on Amazon next year.

Thank you so much for having me on your blog. It’s been an absolute pleasure and I hope I’ve not waffled on too much with the answers to your really interesting questions.

*****

Alys West (2)About Alys

I’ve been obsessed with books and writing since I was a child. My first attempt to write a novel was when I was eight which taught me that it was actually really hard work and took a long, long time!  After working in a book shop in my twenties I got back into writing, turning out very average poetry and one song but mostly I just read an awful lot.  From reading fantasy authors like Guy Gavriel Kay together with mystery and romance I figured out the kind of books I wanted to write. And as a big fan of Buffy the Vampire Slayer I knew that they would have magic in them.

Joining the Romantic Novelists Association New Writers’ Scheme helped me to develop my writing and I got through to the first round of the Wow Factor competition run by Cornerstones Literary Consultancy in 2013. Through the New Writers’ Scheme I met a fabulous group of aspiring novelists who formed The Write Romantics, which has become a popular site for writers and readers.  I’ve just started a MA in Creative Writing at York St John University which I’ll be doing part-time for the next two years.

I live in York and work at the University of York. When I’m not writing or blogging I can be found listening to folk music, getting involved in yarnbombing, doing yoga and drinking far too much tea.

Find Alys at:

Website

Twitter

Facebook

You can read The Dirigible King’s Daughter on Wattpad.

You can also check out her steampunk board on Pinterest at Alys West Writes.