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Tag: writing process

Author Spotlight – Karen Ankers

This month, I have romantic suspense author, Karen Ankers in my Author Spotlight feature. Karen’s début novel, The Crossing Place, described as a love story with dark edges, was published last week and she’s here to tell us more about it and her other writing today.

Karen Ankers – The Crossing Place

A desperate decision made by a young homeless couple has far-reaching consequences and years later, Laura finds her mundane life disrupted by a series of unsettling dreams. When she meets Paul, a handsome and charismatic past-life counsellor, she refuses to accept his suggestion that these dreams might be memories from a previous life. One particularly difficult dream has her turning to him for help and advice, but revelations about his past make her question whether she is able to trust him. When danger comes from an unexpected source, both Laura and Paul have to deal not only with very real threats in the present, but also doubts and fears from the past.
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And now for my interview with Karen:

1. Can you tell us more about what inspired you to choose the setting for your current book?

I set it in Chester, which is where I grew up, so it was easy for me to envisage where the various scenes were taking place. It’s also a city that offers some really interesting places to set scenes.

2. I know you write poetry and plays as well as romantic suspense. How do you go about coming up with ideas for them all?

Ideas come from all sorts of places. People I meet, snippets of conversation, memories, family dynamics.   One of my plays, Frogs, was sparked off when my partner peered into a glass and said “There are frogs in my beer…”! I use writing poetry simply as a writing exercise. It’s a way of stretching my writing muscles and I very rarely know what a poem is going to be about. I just accept and work with what appears on the paper. My novel, The Crossing Place, was inspired by Brian Weiss’ book about reincarnation, Only Love Is Real.

3. How long did it take you to write your first draft of your novel? How many more drafts were there after that?

The first draft actually took several years, because I wrote it and then put it away, meaning to get back to it and revise it. But then life got in the way and it ran the risk of being abandoned. When I eventually got back to it, I wrote two more drafts in the space of six months.

4. What’s the hardest part of writing for you?

The hardest part of writing is trusting my characters enough to let them do what they want. So many times I have tried to make them fit into a story, rather than allow the story to work around them.

5. What do you enjoy most about the writing process?

I love playing with words. I started my writing career as a poet, so I have an inbuilt sense of rhythm and music.

6. Is there going to be a recurring theme in your novels or will each one be completely different?

I think they will be different. It will depend on what the characters want to do! I don’t have a set genre. But I imagine that themes will sometimes recur.

7. Have you started work on your next novel yet? If so, can you tell us anything about it?

My next novel is called The Stone Dancers and is set in Moelfre, North Wales. It’s about a woman whose attempt to reinvent herself is challenged when events from her past catch up with her. So far, it’s a bit of a mystery, with lots of Celtic myth and legend thrown in.

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Thanks for being my guest on the blog this month, Karen. Good luck with your new novel.

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About Karen Ankers


Karen Ankers lives in Anglesey, North Wales, where she draws inspiration for her writing from Wales’ mythic landscape and from the Celtic storytelling tradition. She started her writing career as a poet and has had poems published in various magazines and anthologies. Her first poetry collection, One Word At A Time, was published last year and she regularly reads at local spoken word events. She also writes one-act plays, in which she tries to give a voice to those usually ignored and unheard. These plays are published by Lazy Bee Scripts and have been performed in the UK, America, Australia and Malaysia. The Crossing Place is her first novel.

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Camp NaNoWriMo Update – week 1

2014-Participant-Vertical-Banner Last November, I took part in National Novel Writing Month for the first time and wrote just over 50,000 words for my second novel, which is provisionally titled ‘Seeking Approval’. ‘What’s it about?’ I hear you cry. Well, it’s about a girl who splits up with her fiancé when she finds him cheating on her with her sister. This is not the first time her sister has betrayed her and just when she thinks their relationship will never be the same again, she finds out that she is not her sister but her cousin. Despite their differences, she helps her ‘sister’ to trace her family history and along the way, she becomes clearer about her own identity and what she wants from her own life.

Since the end of November, I have been concentrating on rewriting and editing my first novel, ‘From Here to Nashville’ and so, now that FHTN is with beta readers, I thought I would use this month’s Camp NaNo to pick up with my second novel. I have set myself a goal of writing 25,000 more words this month because we’re off on holiday for almost a week and about 1,000 words a day for the remaining days of the month seems achievable. This first week, I have written just over 8,000 words so I am on target to reach my goal but it really has been hard getting back into it. Finding the time to write that much every day has taken real discipline on my part and even though I had created an outline back before November, it really isn’t detailed enough. I found this out to my cost when I was writing a long section all about a family tree and I had to take a lot of time out to work out dates and places of birth for numerous different characters. It all came together in the end and I wrote much more quickly afterwards but it has made me realise once again how important it is to me to know where I’m going. It would also have been brilliant to have a piece of ‘family tree writing’ software 😉

In fact, I’m still not really sure where the story’s going! I am thinking about it all more though in the time between writing and this helps me when I finally come to sit down at my desk and write my words for the day. I’m enjoying the research I’m doing as well because the story is partly set in France and in an area which I know very well because I have family there. However, there are so many little things you realise that you’re not entirely sure about, even down to where the nearest service station is to the town you’re referring to and I want those things to be as accurate as they can be. I’ve also been including some snippets of French which is what I took my degree in and because of my family, is almost as good as my English but I still find myself checking little things. I want to make sure my French is correct as well because I don’t like to see mistakes in other books with French in so it’s important to me to get it right.

All this is keeping me very busy as you can see but I’m enjoying it nevertheless. Before I go, I wanted to let regular readers know that I will be scheduling next week’s blog post for the very first time because I will be away on holiday but I have been invited to take part in a writing process blog tour. So look out for that post next week which will include the details of three other writers and their blogs which I know you will want to read more about.

If you’re doing Camp NaNo, how’s your first week gone? Do let me know in the comments and as always, thanks for reading and have a good week, y’all 😉