September Brings a Fresh Challenge

My Indie Writing Life

I’m going to be trying a different format for my posts from here on, making them a bit more like a diary of what I’ve been up to between posts. I hope you find it useful 🙂 You may also have noticed that I’ve changed the title of the blog – it seemed like as good a time as any!

 

 

Writing

This is what I imagine Sam to look like *swoon*

The good news is that, as promised, I started editing Sam’s Story this week, one of the sequel novellas I’ve written to From Here to Nashville. I don’t really enjoy editing as I may have mentioned before (!) because I find it much harder than writing the first draft. When you’re writing the first draft, you can let your imagination run wild but once you get to the second draft and you already have a story in place, it becomes much harder to make changes without it having an impact on lots of other parts of the story.

This was the first book I wrote in third person so it was always going to be a challenge for me and I sent this one in to the RNA’s New Writers’ Scheme for its first read in 2015, two whole years ago now. My writing has changed a lot since then, improved even and so it is hard to deal with some of the simple mistakes I was making back then. For example, head hopping, where you switch from one character’s point of view to another’s right in the middle of a scene, making it unclear who’s talking. My RNA reader mentioned this and so did one of my beta readers so I didn’t have to wonder about whether they were right – if more than one person mentions it, it’s clearly an issue and you just have to accept it. And for the most part, it wasn’t actually that hard to deal with but I was annoyed with myself for having done it. However, I think I have moved on from this now and will be able to spot it more easily in the future.

The hardest thing to deal with has been the fact that, as always in my happy ever after world, my characters fall in love far too quickly. As Sam is only just getting over the loss of Rachel to Jackson, it’s important that he doesn’t come across as shallow when meeting someone new, and perhaps falling in love on the rebound. This means that I have to make it all take a bit longer – I have this problem all the time – and in having to do that, I have to change lots of other things as well.

Unfortunately, what I find when I reach a difficult point with editing is that I just stop doing it altogether. It’s simply too hard and I will never be able to master it, is what I tell myself as my excuse for not doing it. I have been trying to do an hour a day but honestly, by the end of the first week, I have the attention span of a gnat and I’m starting to get very frustrated with myself. I’m forcing myself to stick with it because I want to get it finished but it really is proving hard!

Upcoming WI Audition

The other thing I’ve been working on this week is my 15 minute talk for my WI audition next Saturday. They are very strict about timings and I won’t have a full 15 minutes so obviously, I can’t do the full talk I would normally do. I started off by paring down my usual talk about my self-publishing journey to the bare bones confident that this would be more than enough. Then I practised saying it out loud using a stopwatch only to find that I had the grand total of just three minutes! So I have spent the whole week adding content back in – this was only supposed to be a flavour of the talk, not the whole thing! I have now reached seven minutes and I am desperate to get to 10 but I can’t think what else to put in. I never thought I would struggle to find words 😉 Anyway, I will have to plod on as best I can and finish it because the audition is next week and I want it to go well of course.

Marketing

I have been experimenting with Amazon ads again this week for From Here to Nashville with some success but it’s not been brilliant. It is a constant challenge to keep the momentum going with sales of both books really and I feel that I am now approaching the end of the peak for The Vineyard in Alsace so I need to think carefully about what to do next.

Social Life

I am looking forward to another meeting this week of my Society of Authors group, where we’ll be discussing the topic ‘What Makes a Good Story?’ I will also be attending my first RNA AGM this week now that I am officially an independent member. The meeting also includes a talk by Julie Cohen on Pacing and how not to let your reader get bored, which I’m really looking forward to as Julie is always interesting and helpful. I’m travelling down to London with another RNA friend so it will be good to catch up and be writerly for an afternoon 🙂

Freelance Work

Finally, I started a proofreading job this week for an author who writes courses on Teachable and who contacted me as a result of seeing my name in connection with the Open Book festival. It’s funny how you make these connections quite out of the blue but I’m very glad I did.

 

Thanks for reading. Please do leave me a comment if you’d like to talk about anything I mention in the post. It’s always good to chat 🙂

An Eventful Summer in my Indie Author Life

As always, it has been a busy time since my last post. I have an update about the talk I gave at my first literary festival which took place at the end of July; news of how book 2, The Vineyard in Alsace, continues to do well; progress with book 3, and finally, what I have coming up.

Open Book Literary Festival, Hitchin

It has been a bit of a while since my last blog post because I have had such a busy summer in my writing life. As I told you then, I was going to be taking part in my first every Literary Festival in Hitchin, near where I live. Before the event, I was incredibly nervous, not knowing whether anyone would turn up for my talk about my self-publishing journey. Well, the day dawned and it was rainy, just for a change. Our festival was mostly indoors but it would have been nice to have a bit of sunshine! Still, my talk was a great success with lots of people attending and a knowledgeable, interested audience who asked good questions.

We had a good turnout for our first ever festival and I spoke to a lot of people on the day. I definitely noticed an impact on my ebook sales afterwards too, and it looks like we will be doing the festival again next year. So all in all, a good thing to have done to raise awareness of my books. And look at this lovely cake made by Carol Deacon especially for the occasion!

 

The Vineyard in Alsace

My second book continues to sell well and if you are a regular visitor to my Facebook page, you’ll know that I’ve had some wonderful guest posts and interviews over the summer. First of all, I was on the lovely Tara Greaves’ website in her excellent A Look Behind the Book feature. You can read it here. Shortly afterwards, Tara posted a glowing review of my book on Amazon, which I was delighted with:

A story that warms you, like sitting outside in the late evening sunshine

More recently, I was on Linda Hill’s blog here, with a post about why I write Happy Ever After endings. I got a lot of feedback about this post because I think it struck a chord with a lot of readers. One of my writing friends even chose this theme for his MA in Creative Writing! Linda has also very kindly offered to read my book so I’m looking forward to reading her review sometime in the near future when her TBR pile has gone down a bit!

I also heard this month that my book is going to be featured in Living France magazine’s October issue as a result of me sending a paperback copy to one of their editors for review. I have absolutely no idea whether they liked it but I’m keeping my fingers crossed! I’ll let you know when I find out.

I had another milestone with The Vineyard this week when I woke up one morning to find my book in the top 100 Holiday fiction list on Amazon. It’s still hanging on in there for the moment, which is wonderful to see.

Book 3

Once the LitFest was over, I had to knuckle down in my writing cave to finish the first draft of my third book by the deadline of 31st August. It was a bit touch and go at times but eventually I did it and sent it off to the RNA’s New Writers’ Scheme for its first professional read. By the time I got to the end, I honestly felt it was the best first draft I’ve ever written but only time will tell! It will be interesting next year when I’m no longer a member of the NWS and I will have to find someone else to fulfil that function. I will be a fully fledged Independent Author member by then and will have to find my own way with that first assessment of each manuscript. There are no shortage of people offering that service but they want a lot of money for doing so. Anyway, that’s something for another day 🙂

Coming Up

Next week, I will begin editing (I will, I will) the follow up novella I wrote for From Here to Nashville some time ago. I have booked this in with my editor so I really can’t afford to put it off any longer. Anyway, I do want to get on with Sam’s story now because I hope to publish it before the end of the year – ambitious, I know. Ideally, I would get it off to my editor before book 3 comes back and demands my attention. When it’s ready to go out, I have a plan for its launch that I’ll be looking for people to get involved with so keep an eye out for my next post!

 

I think that’s all the news for now, and is probably quite enough to be going on with. Do leave a comment here on my website if you’d like to or alternatively, contact me on Facebook or Twitter. Thanks for reading. And if you’ve recently read either of my books, do please take a moment to leave a review – they’re so important for indie authors especially 🙂

 

Author Spotlight – Karen King

My Author Spotlight feature is a bit like that old saying about buses this month – you don’t see any for ages and then two come along at once! This week, it’s my pleasure to welcome romance author, Karen King, to my blog who is here to tell us all about her latest release, The Cornish Hotel by the Sea.

The Cornish Hotel by the Sea – Karen King

Ellie Truman’s widowed mum is struggling to keep Gwel Teg, the family hotel in Cornwall, afloat.  Ellie is determined to do everything in her power to help her, even if that means moving back to the sleepy Cornish village she fled from broken-hearted a few years ago.
Things go wrong from the start and she’s grateful for the help from hunky guest, Reece Mitchell. But does Reece have ulterior motives? Will Ellie’s efforts be for nothing?

 

 

 

Amazon

Waterstones

W.H.Smiths

*****

And now for my interview with Karen:

Can you tell us more about what inspired you to choose the setting for your current book?

The Cornish Hotel by the Sea is set in Cornwall, a place I’ve lived in for almost a decade and visited for years previous to that. Writing it brought back so many happy memories.

I know you write books for younger readers as well as romantic fiction. Do you find it hard to come up with ideas for stories? How do you go about it?

No, ideas are always coming to me. Anything can start them off, something I see, something I overhear, places I’ve visited. I’ve often overheard something on a train or in a queue and thought ‘that’d make a good story’ or ‘I can use that’. I always try to carry a notebook and pen with me but failing that I’ll use anything to scribble on, till receipts, a napkin, the back of my hand.

How long does it take you to write your first draft? How many more drafts will there be after that?

It’s difficult to say as I never work on just one project. I usually have a couple of books on the go – I have three at the moment – and I’m a writing tutor too so a lot of my time is taken up marking other people’s work. It also depends what I’m writing – children’s books are a lot shorter than romantic novels. If I was to concentrate solely on the one romantic novel of approx. 75,00o words I’d say I could write a first draft in a couple of months. I then revise and rewrite several times, writing as many as ten drafts.

What’s the hardest part of writing for you?

Finding the time to write all the ideas I have in my notebooks.

What do you enjoy most about the writing process?

Getting the story out of my head onto paper/the screen. I work out character profiles and the main story outline then start writing the story down as it comes. I love watching the characters and story develop and grow, how it goes off in tangents I hadn’t thought of or the characters do something I hadn’t planned but seems so right.

Is there a recurring theme in your novels or is each one completely different?

Feisty heroines who don’t want to get tied down feature quite a bit – as in Never Say Forever and The Cornish Hotel by the Sea. In The Millionaire Plan and I do?…or do I? the heroines are getting married for the wrong reasons so I guess there’s a bit of a connection there. Also, I always have part of the story set in the UK and part abroad. I didn’t plan that, it just happened.

Have you started work on your next novel yet? If so, can you tell us anything about it?

I’ve just finished my next novel for Accent Press, it’ll be published next year. I can’t give away the title or the plot just yet but I’ve seen the cover and it’s gorgeous. I’m now working on three novels A YA, an emotional drama and a romance novel so I’m keeping busy!

Thank you so much for inviting me over, Julie.

My pleasure! Thanks for being such a lovely guest, Karen 🙂

 

About Karen

A member of the Romantic Novelists’ Association, the Society of Authors and the Society of Women Writers and Journalists, Karen King writes sassy, fun, heart-warming romance. The Cornish Hotel by the Sea is her second chick lit for Accent Press, her first – I do?… or do I? was published last year and there is another one in the process of publication. In addition, Accent Press have republished her earlier romance novels, The Millionaire Plan and Never Say Forever.

Karen has also written several short stories for women’s magazines and had 120 children’s books published.

When she isn’t writing, Karen likes travelling, watching the ‘soaps’ and reading. Give her a good book and a box of chocolates and she thinks she’s in Heaven.

 

Find out more about Karen here:

Website

Twitter

Karen King Romance Author Facebook Page

Karen King Young Adult Books Facebook Page

Author Spotlight – Helen Pollard

My guest in the Author Spotlight this week is no stranger to my blog. Helen Pollard, contemporary romance author, was my first guest in my Author Spotlight series all the way back in May 2015! I think it’s fair to say that a great deal has happened in Helen’s writing career in that time and she’s here to tell us all about it today and to celebrate her latest book published just a few days ago. Welcome Helen!

Summer at The Little French Guesthouse – Helen Pollard

A feel good novel to read in the sun (La Cour des Roses Book 3)

Summer sun, chilled, white wine, and a gorgeous fiancé. Nothing could upset pure bliss … Right?

Emmy Jamieson loves her new life in the gentle hills and sunflowers of the lush French countryside, managing La Cour des Roses, a beautiful, white stone guesthouse. With marriage to caramel-eyed Alain just round the corner, things couldn’t be more perfect.

The odd glass (gallon) of wine dulls the sound of Emmy’s mum in full motherzilla-of-the-bride mode, and the faint tinkling of alarm bells coming from Alain’s ex are definitely nothing to worry about. Guesthouse owner Rupert and a whole host of old and new friends are there to make sure nothing gets in the way of Emmy’s happiness.

But as Emmy gets close to the big day, a secret from the past throws everything decidedly off track. Will her idyllic French wedding go ahead as planned, or will Emmy run back home to England with a broken heart?

This summer, escape to the rolling vineyards of France for an utterly uplifting read. Fans of Jenny Colgan, Debbie Johnson and Nick Alexander will want to join Emmy for a pain au chocolat in the sun-drenched garden at La Cour des Roses.

Amazon UK

Amazon US

*****

And now for my interview with Helen:

Since you were last on the blog, you’ve been taken on by Bookouture. How did that all come about?

The first book in the La Cour des Roses series was a change in direction for me, veering away from ‘sweet’ romance towards chick lit. I’d written the first draft five or six years before, and kept revisiting it and rewriting. I really wanted to find the right home for it, where I could express my ‘voice’ and sense of humour.

I submitted to Bookouture as I’d heard that they are a very dynamic digital publisher. When I got the e-mail to say they would like to publish the book, I was thrilled that they had such confidence in the story I’d worked on for so long!

You’ve published two books in your La Cour des Roses series, with the third one just published last week, can you tell us more about your inspiration for this series?

I’d had the opening scene for The Little French Guesthouse in my mind for years – how would someone feel if they caught their boyfriend with an older rather than a younger woman – but I wasn’t doing any writing at the time (young family, no time, too tired!) Then, one summer, we were on holiday in a gîte in the Loire area of France, and I suddenly thought, ‘This is it! This is where that scene takes place!’ Once I could picture the setting in my mind, I was desperate to get that opening scene down, so I started writing again . . . The creative floodgates reopened, and the characters took on a life of their own. Could Emmy gain strength from that catastrophic start to the first book? Make new friends who might help her through it? Contemplate a different life for herself?

I had to be more disciplined with the second and third books, obviously, to set up plot points and to tie everyone’s stories together – there were so many secondary characters clamouring to have their stories explored alongside Emmy’s adventures.

Was this always going to be a series or did it develop into one along the way? How different has it been to write a series compared to a standalone book?

When I submitted the first book to Bookouture, I mentioned that I had ideas for a sequel, but they were so taken with the setting and the central character that they suggested a series. We agreed between us that three books would be the perfect number to cover the stories to be told.

Writing a series has been quite an experience, and yes, very different. With a standalone book, I’m inclined to see where the characters want to take me. That isn’t possible with a series – you have to plan more, so that everything ties together and there are no contradictions between books. Of course, you already know your characters really well, so it’s easy to get right back into the groove with them, but it also makes secondary and incidental characters more important, so the reader doesn’t become bored.

Will there be other books in this series or have you got something else planned for your next book?

So no, no further books in the La Cour des Roses series. It’s been an exhausting ride, so I’m hoping to take a good long break and recharge my batteries!

You have an incredible 705 reviews of The Little French Guesthouse on Amazon at the time of writing! What’s the secret do you think to getting so many?

Bookouture would have to take credit for getting the ball rolling on that score. They have an incredible publicity manager, Kim Nash, who is a book blogger and knows that online community well. Bookouture put the book on NetGalley, Kim got the word out, and many book bloggers kindly reviewed and – thankfully – enjoyed the book 🙂 I guess it’s had a snowball effect from there. I still can’t believe the number of reviews on Amazon myself!

Are there any other places you’re dreaming of setting another book, and if so, why?

I’d love to set a book by the sea sometime, either in Cornwall or North Yorkshire. Those coastal villages have a lot of atmosphere and the scenery is spectacular. The perfect backdrop.

I read on your blog that one of your favourite things to do with your spare time is to watch old TV shows from the eighties. One of your favourites is Starsky and Hutch, which also happens to be one of mine. And now this is a really important question…Which one of them did you love the most: Starsky or Hutch??

Oh, I was SO in love with Paul Michael Glaser. Spectacular smile, hairy chest, tight jeans … I wanted trainers like his and a chunky woolly cardi like his! But I do confess I possessed a David Soul LP, and I still have (and still listen to) a CD of his 🙂

I know you love to read as much as you can as well, naturally. So who would you say is your favourite literary hero from any book you’ve read?

Crikey! That’s a difficult one! I think I would have to go with Holden Caulfield from The Catcher in the Rye. He really resonated with me when I read the book as a teenager.

If I had to go with someone more modern, I would say Mma Ramotswe from Alexander McCall Smith’s books set in Botswana – a wise, gentle, grounded woman.

 

Thanks so much for being on my blog again, Helen. I hope you’ll come back sooner next time! By the way, in case anyone wants to know, Starsky was my favourite too 😉

 

About Helen

As a child, Helen had a vivid imagination fuelled by her love of reading, so she started to create her own stories in a notebook.

She still prefers fictional worlds to real life, believes characterisation is the key to a successful book, and enjoys infusing her writing with humour and heart.

When she’s not writing, Helen enjoys reading, scrapbooking and watching old seventies and eighties TV shows.

Helen is a member of the Romantic Novelists’ Association and The Society of Authors.

 

Find out more about Helen here:

Website & Blog 

Facebook

Twitter

A Month of Milestones

When I wrote my last post, some time ago (ahem!), I told you all how pleased I was to have found out that I was eligible to join The Society of Authors as an ’emerging author.’

Since then, I’ve attended a couple of meetings of my local group in Hitchin and as a result, I am now going to be taking part in the first ever Open Book Literary Festival in Hitchin on the 29th of this month. I will be giving a talk entitled ‘My Journey from Complete Beginner to Self-Published Author – How and Why I Self-Publish my Contemporary Romance Novels’ and my books will also be on sale that day to festival visitors. I am both very excited and frightened to death by the prospect of giving a talk at a festival but I have to start somewhere and I’m really glad that I’ll have the opportunity to fulfil this milestone.

In the run-up to the festival, there’s going to be lots of publicity:

  • we’re on the SoA website as an event!
  • We’re going to be on display in Waterstones in Hitchin in their local authors window.
  • We’re going to be featured in Writing Magazine and also in lots of local press.

In the course of trying to arrange for my books to be available for Waterstones to order directly if anyone asks, I found that my first book, From Here to Nashville, is actually available on their website already! Who knew? However, The Vineyard in Alsace is not there. Both my books are listed on Nielsen and I’ve had orders for the first one through Gardners, one of the two main book distributors so I’m just trying to join up all the dots to see if I can make this happen for my second book too. All in all, it is going to be an exciting time. If you are in the area or nearby that day, please do come along – it would be lovely to have some support in the audience. Tickets are available here.

*****

I have just come back from a lovely holiday in Menorca, during which I really felt like I got away from it all, even though I took my computer with me and we had Wi-Fi access. I took my laptop mainly because I needed to carry on writing my next book whenever possible. I have reached a real sticking point with it around about chapter 10/11 and despite rewriting several times, I’ve just not been able to move forward. I spent a lot of time talking over the issues in the book with my husband on holiday and that did help to clarify the story. I was just about moving on when we came home again! I really need to maintain that discipline as we go through this month and next to get my book finished if I can.

The pressure behind this happening is because I have to submit it to the RNA’s New Writers’ Scheme by the end of August and I value the feedback I get from that report so much that I really want to meet that deadline. This is especially important this year because… drum roll please… I will be graduating from the NWS this year to become an Independent Author of the Romantic Novelists’ Association. My second book, The Vineyard in Alsace, has done so well that I have now met all the criteria in terms of books published, sales and profits, that I am eligible to leave the NWS behind. I am so proud of this achievement that I have reached all by my own effort and although I will be sad to leave the NWS, I will be very honoured by my new membership status.

This is yet another milestone for me, along with the fact that my second book has now sold more copies in just over three months than my first book has sold all together (although I’m still very proud of Nashville too). I have to confess to being a little obsessed by the data on my Kindle Publishing dashboard (the other reason I took the laptop) but it’s so satisfying to see those sales rising every day! Last month was incredible with my sales reaching dizzying new heights and there’s even been a knock-on effect with extra sales of Nashville, the like of which I haven’t seen since I first published it. I did also try my hand at a couple of Amazon Ads for Nashville which I believed helped things along. I have thought about doing a free deal but I just can’t bring myself to do this so I’m always exploring various book marketing ideas to keep those sales coming in.

I’m looking forward to seeing what July will bring in my writing life and will report back on that next time! I have a couple of lovely romance authors being featured on my blog this month as well. Firstly, Helen Pollard on the 16th, who was my very first guest on my Author Spotlight feature many moons ago, and then Karen King on the 23rd. I’m looking forward to sharing their news about their new books with you. Until next time, thanks for reading 🙂

Author Spotlight – Marie Laval

My author in the spotlight this month is contemporary and historical romance author, Marie Laval. Marie is here to tell us about the first of her Dancing for the Devil trilogy of books, The Dream Catcher. Welcome to My Writing Life, Marie.

The Dream Catcher – Marie Laval

Can her love heal his haunted heart? – Cape Wrath, Scotland, November 1847

Bruce McGunn is a man as brutal and unforgiving as his land. Discharged from the army, he is haunted by the spectres of his fallen comrades and convinced he is going mad. And he is running out of time to save his estate from the machinations of Cameron McRae, heir to the McGunns’ ancestral enemies. When the clipper carrying McRae’s new bride is caught in a violent storm and docks at Wrath harbour, Bruce decides to revert to the old ways and hold the clipper and the woman to ransom. However, far from the spoilt heiress he expected, Rose is genuine, funny and vulnerable – a ray of sunshine in the long, harsh winter that has become his life.

Rose is determined to escape Wrath and its proud master – the man she calls McGlum. Will she be reunited with Cameron McRae, the dazzlingly handsome aristocrat she married after a whirlwind romance in Algiers, or will she risk her heart and her honour to help Bruce discover the truth about his past and solve the brutal murders committed on his land?

The Dream Catcher, Book 1 in the Dancing for the Devil Trilogy, is available here. You can find all Marie’s novels here.

 

 

*****

And now for my interview with Marie:

  1. Can you tell us more about what inspired you to choose the setting for your most recent book?

Scotland! I have always found it one of the most romantic and fascinating settings, ever since I was young. My latest historical romance – The Dancing for the Devil trilogy – is set in Scotland and when I finished writing it I wanted to set another story there. So I wrote a contemporary romantic suspense and set it in a small village and a run-down castle in the Cairngorms. Of course, there is a ghost…it wouldn’t be Scotland without one! I had a lot of fun writing that novel.

  1. Do you find it hard to come up with ideas for stories? How do you go about it?

Oh no. It’s just the opposite in fact. I have notebooks filled with ideas for novels, series, short stories, and at times I don’t know which one to pick up because I want to write them all! It is very frustrating.

  1. How long does it take you to write your first draft? How many more drafts will there be after that?

It could be anything between six months and a year. I work full-time as a teacher so I never seem to have much time to write during the week. However I make up for it at weekends and during the holidays. There can be up to four drafts after the initial one, plus the edits, so it is really a lot of work. As I am a complete ‘pantser’ I waste a lot of time backtracking, deleting whole scenes or characters even, or starting from scratch all over again. I wish I plotted more, but I suppose that’s the way I work…

  1. What’s the hardest part of writing for you?

The sudden realisation half-way through writing the story, that something quite major isn’t working. It can be the personality of the hero or the heroine, or a subplot. Sometimes it’s hard to accept that I have been wrong and have to start from scratch all over again. It’s happened to me for my novel set in the Cairngorms I mentioned earlier, and unfortunately this seems to be happening right now with the sequel to my Scottish novel, which is set in Paris. I fear I may have overcomplicated things!

  1. What do you enjoy most about the writing process?

I love that magical moment when the characters take a life of their own, and when I just seem to be typing their words as they speak and watching them do things. For me as a writer, that’s the best feeling in the world.

  1. I know you write both contemporary and historical romance novels but I wondered if there is a recurring theme in your novels or whether each one is completely different?

Every one of my stories has a romance at its heart, with a ‘mystery’ and a hint of paranormal as a subplot. I’ve always loved a good mystery, when the author doesn’t spell out exactly what is going on – think M.R. James, although I would not dare compare myself to such a brilliant author! I would like my readers to wonder if there is really something ‘ghostly’ or ‘otherworldly’ going on or if it’s only in the protagonists’ imagination.

  1. Have you started work on your next novel yet? If so, can you tell us anything about it?

I am about half way through the first draft of the contemporary romantic suspense which is the sequel to my Cairngorms novel, and which is set in Paris in the world of auction houses and ancient illuminated manuscripts. Since it’s a contemporary novel I was really torn about some of the events that have taken place in France – and Europe. Should I mention the terrorist attacks and heightened security? Or the new French president – who by the way I find quite attractive? Should I mention Brexit at all?

Thank you very much for welcoming me on your blog, Julie, and for your questions!

About Marie

Originally from Lyon in France, Marie has lived in the beautiful Rossendale Valley, Lancashire, England, for the past few years and likes nothing more than dreaming up romance stories and handsome, brooding heroes. She writes historical and contemporary romance.

Her contemporary romance, bestselling A Spell in Provence, as well as her historical romances, Angel Heart, The Lion’s Embrace, and the Dancing for the Devil Trilogy (which includes The Dream Catcher, Blue Bonnets and Sword Dance) are published by Áccent Press.

Marie also enjoys writing short stories. Her short story Sons of the Wind was her contribution to Letterbox Love Stories, a romantic anthology by international bestselling authors, which was released in July 2016. The Ravine of the Wild Woman will be published in a new anthology Escape to Africa which will be released at the end of June 2017.

Find out more about Marie here:

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Deepings LitFest and a Look Forward to May

Deepings Literary Festival 2017I have just spent a lovely couple of days at a Literary Festival not far from me in Market Deeping, Cambridgeshire. My good friend and fellow romance author, Ros Rendle (whose books you can find here), lives there and she alerted me to the festival early on so I was able to book to attend a couple of brilliant events before everyone else cottoned on! The Festival came about through the efforts of their Deepings Community Library. This library was threatened with closure by the local council until a group of community volunteers took it over and saved it. What better way to celebrate that success than with a Literary Festival?

And sBlack Water - Louise Doughtyo it was that I went trundling up the A1 from Bedfordshire to Cambridgeshire on Friday afternoon for my first session which was a Creative Writing Workshop with Louise Doughty, no less, the author who wrote the brilliant psychological thriller, Apple Tree Yard which was recently shown on the BBC. I was very excited to meet Louise of course – I’d loved the book and the TV series – but also to hear how she goes about plotting. There were about twenty of us there for the workshop and Louise asked us all to start by saying how much writing experience we had. Most people there were not writers but it was quite a surprise to find that I had sat down next to a new member of the RNA’s New Writers’ Scheme – how uncanny! You know what they say about ‘Birds of a Feather…’

Anyway, Louise was very generous with her knowledge and her handouts! She is about to start writing her ninth book and she said she always starts with a vision of a character in a situation. For Apple Tree Yard, she saw a woman (Yvonne) in the dock at the Old Bailey and she knew in her mind that the woman was about to be caught out in a great lie. She didn’t obviously know what that lie was yet but she knew it would be the character’s undoing. Louise also knew that the man standing next to the woman, was the woman’s lover not her husband. And that was it. She said she sometimes lets the idea germinate for up to two years before she starts writing and in that time, she will write the odd scene and collect lots of material from her research. She then works on the basis of three critical plot points at 25%, 50% and 75% – many of us will have come across that idea before – but Louise elaborated on it by saying that it’s not just about making something happen at each plot point  They have to be events which change the situation irrevocably for the character – there can be no going back from it, which has certainly got me thinking about how I might need to change my current work in progress…Louise Doughty signed copy

After the workshop, Louise answered questions for another hour and would have gone on longer, I think, had there been enough time. I had received a copy of her latest book, Black Water, as part of the workshop and was even able to get it signed before leaving. Louise was also given a gift by the organisers of the festival. I’ll have to tell you what it was because I don’t think you’ll guess. A local butcher’s had made some Apple Tree Yard sausages in celebration of Louise’s visit to the festival and she was given some to take home! I also bought some the following day and I can confirm that they were very delicious 🙂

Grasmere Butcher;s, Market Deeping

 

Erica James - Deepings Literary Frestival 2017My first session the next day involved lunch and conversation with bestselling women’s fiction author, Erica James. I have to confess that I’ve not read any of her books before but after listening to her speak and tell us about her writing career and her life, I’m looking forward to discovering this ‘new’ author. She’s written fifteen books as well so that will keep me busy for a long while! Her latest one is Song of the Skylark and it looks like a lovely story. Once again, I was lucky to be in the company of some good friends at this event, even though I went on my own. My friend, Ros introduced Erica, and I managed to sit at a table with another friend and romance author, Karen Aldous (who also has a bit of a thing for French vineyards!) and her husband on one side, and lovely book blogger and reviewer, Linda Hill of lindasbookbag.com on my other side. We had a wonderful lunch at Lilli’s Tearoom in Market Deeping, Lilli's Tearoom, Market Deepingwith dainty sandwiches, scones and cakes all taken with a lovely cup of tea! Linda’s husband took a super picture of us all enjoying our tea, which you can see on Linda’s post about the festival here.

And so I waddled back to the library for my final session of the festival. This was a Read Dating session where there were ten local authors with their books and you got to sit down with each of them for about five minutes before the bell rang and you moved on to someone else. A unique way to introduce readers to new writers. Most of the writers were new to me and it was really enjoyable to meet them and find out about their publishing journeys while sharing my own. But my best conversation of all was with my friend, Jane Isaac, who I ‘met’ almost as soon as I went online but have never had the pleasure of meeting in real life until this weekend. Jane writes crime thrillers and her latest book, The Lies Within, is coming out on Tuesday. It was such a pleasure to meet Jane in person and to chat together, albeit briefly, and such a wonderful reminder of the benefits of social media in bringing people together.

Bookmark - Jane Isaac

*****

My book The Vineyard in Alsace continues to sell well as it comes up to its third month since publication. I will be visiting the blog of another romance writer this month, Karen King, taking part in her Travel Thursday feature, so look out for that on the 18th.

I’m also going to be attending a craft fair on 21st May with my books and as a result, I discovered that I would need Public Liability Insurance (don’t ask!) Anyway, the cheapest quote I found was via The Society of Authors and while I was exploring their site again, I realised that I qualify to be an Associate Member of The Society. When I looked at the criteria previously, I obviously didn’t read the conditions properly. So I am now an official member of The SoA and will be attending my local writers’ meeting next month for the first time 🙂

I’m also off to the RNA’s Summer Party this month where the Joan Hessayon Award winner will be announced. A number of my friends have qualified for this award this year by having been given a traditional contract by a publisher after being on the New Writers’ Scheme. So I’m really looking forward to going and celebrating with them all, regardless of who wins.

After all that, I will need a holiday, which is lucky because I have one coming up in June!